Skip to content

Erica’s Handout on the Art of Persuasion

July 15, 2010

Presenting with Confidence

Remember, presentations are about building a real relationship, so try to

establish rapport by referring to thing you are sharing with the audience.

e.g: Wow, I never knew that (quote previous speaker) or isn’t it a beautiful location etc.

  • Practice making eye contact with people in less formal situations. Notice how it feels to invite them into your space and to focus on you.
  • As you are going to be taking their time and attention, be sure to be confident of your material before you go on.
  • Remember, that people are in the audience because they want to be. The more confident, engaged and enthusiastic you are, the happier they will be too.
  • If you are feeling very nervous – say so – this relieves the tension that the audience will be feeling as they worry about how uncomfortable you seem – be honest! This creates the relationship/conversation that makes a presentation effective.
  • Beginning, middle and end. The beginning is to introduce you and your subject, the end is to summarise what you have said and say thanks. So the middle, ideally, is three clear and memorable points on the subject of your choice. Too little rather than too much is always better.
  • Try not to read off the power point or your notes, try just to use these to prompt your thoughts. Practice in front of a mirror, a camcorder or your mates to get feedback and become comfortable with your material.
  • Acknowledge yourself for your courage. After moving house and someone dying, speaking in public is our third most scary experience!



Advertisements

Feedback from DEVELOPING SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS RELATIONSHIPS : PEOPLE MANAGEMENT with Julia Miles of QED Coaching 30th June 2010

July 6, 2010

“I found the talk helpful, great subject shame there wasn’t more of it” Katherine-Driving Instructor

“Very interesting event lots of useful tips to use.” Ann-Coach

“Informative, good for the time constraint. There was a positive atmosphere and there are really nice people” Daniel-Graphic Designer

“The course covered everything I wanted it to and more”  Magadelana Technique Teacher

“The talk was very useful and the event has been really positive experience all round” Rob Attraction Coach

“Good networking opportunity – interesting to talk to lots of people” John – Adventures to Peru

“Very interesting and informative information; I see how this could inform all my communications” Gerry – Choir Master

“Very motivating and i will come again” Tom – Designer

Participant Feedback from BScene’s workshop “The Art of Persuasion” with Erica Sosna of TheLifeProject.co.uk, Mon 7th June 2010

June 16, 2010

Ayse (graphic designer) “Practical skills given in a very friendly workshop”

Ann (coach) “Very useful session and very pertinent, met some interesting people”

Katherine (driving instructor) “Got a lot of pointers and clarified how to go about presenting”

Chris (technical director) “Taught me the power of silence, the slower you speak the more people take in”

Lucy (Director) “The power of pausing”

Camilla (retailer of super foods) “I’ve got quite a lot to learn-got me thinking about how to get my ideas into a concise way to get peoples attention”

Darren (recycling processing) “Refined my thoughts at the essence of what my business is about”

Helen “Interesting to hear people do pitches and learn to structure one effectively”

Shirley (nutritionist)  “Great for meeting like minded people, local people and lots of helpful info gained”

Jerry (distributor)  “Well structured workshop about how to put together your pitch well, very informative and good for networking”

For more BScene free events please go to –

http://bscene.ning.com/events/event/listUpcoming

Intuition and Leadership workshop May 17, 2010: Feedback from those attending

May 26, 2010

Intuition and Leadership workshop with Mark Walsh of Integration Training. Participants said:
“Really useful and very good.”
“Exceptionally marvellous.”
“Like the body/physical aspects of the talk and the activities were stimulating.”
“Informative and stimulating.”

BScene network in and training event May 17, 2010

Top tips! – How To Get Funding – Notes from Andrew Devon’s Talk

May 10, 2010

 Top tips!

Completing Forms!

  1. Check spelling and grammar on the PC
  2. Get someone else to read the application from outside the organisation
  3. Cut excessive use of jargon
  4. Don’t waffle
  5. Don’t assume that the assessor will know what you do
  6. If you are quoting statistics or information put a reference as to where they came from
  7. If you are giving numbers of people you are helping be exact as possible – e.g. rather saying we help 100 people use 102 as this may appear more real
  8. Check budgets add up
  9. Don’t leave writing applications to the last minute as this causes stress
  10. Make sure that if you need an extra signatory that this person is around to sign the form and that you can still submit it on time

Andrew Devon runs Salvia Fundraising, www.salviafundraising.co.uk – a fundraising and training consultancy, based in East Sussex, helping charities and other not-for-profit organisations throughout the UK. Andrew’s main experience is in raising funds from charitable trusts and foundations. He also has experience in raising funds from the statutory sector, companies, through Church groups, the public, door-to-door and street collections, events, and from Europe.

To contact Andrew email andrewd@salviafundraising.co.uk or phone 01273 207626 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting

‘Organisations Competing for Funds’ – Notes from Andrew Devon’s Talk on How To Get Funding:

May 10, 2010

Organisations Competing for Funds

 

Statutory Sector

The statutory sector involves all the organisations that are set up, controlled and funded by the government, for example Councils, Local Authorities and NHS hospitals.  The statutory sector is funded by people who pay taxes and national insurance etc.  This is different from the independent sector which involves organisations being run by business people who are usually in it to make profit. 

Charity Sector

The charity sector is also known as the voluntary sector, the voluntary and community sector (VCS) and the third sector.  It exists between the private and public sectors. The charity industry continues to grow significantly; there has been a 26% increase in the amount of employees over the last decade. It also has a third of degree holders which is a higher proportion than both the public and the private sectors. The charity sector’s income is just under £28billion and just over a third of this comes from statutory sources. (The UK Voluntary Sector Almanac, National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO))

There are approximately 211,586 charities in the UK as follows:

  • England & Wales – 168,500 with an income of 49.9 billion
  • Scotland – 23,806 with an income of 12.9 billion
  • Northern Ireland – no exact record but about 10,000 charities but no estimate of income

 

Social Enterprises

Social enterprises are businesses driven by a social or environmental purpose. There are 62,000 of them in the UK, contributing over £24bn to the economy, employing approximately 800,000 people (2005-2007 data from the Annual Survey of Small Business UK).   As with all businesses, they compete to deliver goods and services. The difference is that social purpose is at the very heart of what they do, and the profits they make are reinvested towards achieving that purpose. Well known examples of social enterprises include The Big Issue, Jamie Oliver’s restaurant Fifteen, and the fair-trade chocolate company Divine Chocolate.  The government defines social enterprises as “businesses with primarily social objectives whose surpluses are principally reinvested for that purpose in the business or in the community, rather than being driven by the need to maximise profit for shareholders and owners.”  Social enterprises operate in almost every industry in the UK, from health and social care to renewable energy, from retail to recycling, from employment to sport, from housing to education. Whatever they do, they do it differently from typical business, because they are driven by a social and/or environmental mission, and they are focused on the community they serve.  In a recent survey of social enterprises 45% of respondents said that ‘putting something back into the community’ was their reason for setting up a social enterprise.

Community Interest Companies

Community Interest Companies (CICs) are limited companies, with special additional features, created for the use of people who want to conduct a business or other activity for community benefit, and not purely for private advantage. This is achieved by a “community interest test” and “asset lock”, which ensures that the CIC is established for community purposes and the assets and profits are dedicated to these purposes. Registration of a company as a CIC has to be approved by the Regulator who also has a continuing monitoring and enforcement role.

 

Schools and Universities

Universities, colleges, secondary, junior, infant and nursery schools.  They are deemed to be part of the statutory sector.  However they do not cover fee paying private schools.

Individuals

  • People who have fallen on hard times and apply for grants from charitable trusts or statutory grants
  • People who need funding to do a fundraising event
  • People who require funding to go on for example a university course

Andrew Devon runs Salvia Fundraising, www.salviafundraising.co.uk – a fundraising and training consultancy, based in East Sussex, helping charities and other not-for-profit organisations throughout the UK. Andrew’s main experience is in raising funds from charitable trusts and foundations. He also has experience in raising funds from the statutory sector, companies, through Church groups, the public, door-to-door and street collections, events, and from Europe.

To contact Andrew email andrewd@salviafundraising.co.uk or phone 01273 207626

‘Funding Available’ – Notes from Andrew Devon’s Talk on How To Get Funding

May 10, 2010

Funding Available

  1. 1.      Statutory Funding

 

European

Various funding streams but many concerned with employment issues, enterprise and cultural exchanges. 

National

Funding provided from Government departments.  Examples of Government departments (you will have to contact each department to see what funding is available):

 

Regional

Funding from the South East England Development Agency (SEEDA) www.seeda.co.uk/Global_Competitiveness/Funding_&_Advice/  SEEDA is the Government funded agency set up in 1999 responsible for the economic and social development of the South East of England – the driving force of the UK’s economy.  They have funds from Government to invest directly in a range of economic and social development programmes, and they are in a position to help secure European Union and private sector investment for the region.

County

West Sussex County Council – www.westsussex.gov.uk/ccm/navigation/community-and-living/grants—funding/

East Sussex County Council – www.eastsussex.gov.uk/community/funding/sources/default.html

City

Brighton & Hove Council – www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/index.cfm?request=c1212095

Local Authority

e.g.  Arun District Council. 

Town

e.g. Littlehampton Town Council

Parish

e.g. Ferring Parish Council 

 

  1. 2.      Lottery Funding

For every £1 that the public spends on Lottery tickets 28 pence goes to the Lottery good causes. These are the arts, charities and voluntary groups, heritage, health, education, the environment and sports. Lottery funders are the organisations that distribute the good causes’ money to local communities and national projects.  

Examples of Lottery Funders:

  • Arts Council England – Arts Council England is the national development agency for the arts in England, distributing public money from Government and the National Lottery.
  • Awards for All – Awards for All is a Lottery grants programme aimed at local communities.
  • Big Lottery Fund – The Big Lottery Fund is committed to improving communities and the lives of people most in need.
  • Heritage Lottery Fund – The Heritage Lottery Fund uses money from the National Lottery to give grants for a wide range of projects involving the local, regional and national heritage of the United Kingdom.
  • Olympic Lottery Distributor – The Olympic Lottery Distributor’s remit is to support the delivery of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. The Olympic Lottery Distributor is not currently running any open funding rounds.
  • Sport England – Sport England invests in projects that help people to start, stay and succeed in sport and physical activity at every level.
  • UK Film Council – As the lead agency for film, the UK Film Council aims to stimulate a competitive, successful and vibrant UK film industry and culture, both now and for the future.
  • UK Sport – Working in partnership to lead sport in the UK to world-class success.

 

For more information on each funder go to http://www.lotteryfunding.org.uk/uk/lottery-funders-listing.htm

 

  1. 3.      Charitable Trusts

A charitable trust is a charity themselves that provides grants to other charities and sometimes to non-charities.  There are approximately 9,000 charitable trusts in the UK.  They give out approximately £750 million per year.  Major trusts include the Tudor Trust, Henry Smith Charity, the Esmee Fairbairn Foundation and the Ernest Kleinwort Charitable Trust.  Local trusts include the Sussex Community Foundation and the Argus Appeal.

  1. 4.      Companies

They give out approximately £600m per year in various forms such as Cash Donations; Gifts in Kind; Payroll Giving; Secondments and Volunteers. 

 

  1. 5.      The Public

No exact measure of how much the public give per annum but as a rough estimate £1.3billion.  Examples of how they give: Individual donations including gift aid; standing orders and direct debits; membership schemes; collection tins, face-to-face collections and envelope drops; sponsoring events; TV advert;  and legacies.

Andrew Devon runs Salvia Fundraising, www.salviafundraising.co.uk – a fundraising and training consultancy, based in East Sussex, helping charities and other not-for-profit organisations throughout the UK. Andrew’s main experience is in raising funds from charitable trusts and foundations. He also has experience in raising funds from the statutory sector, companies, through Church groups, the public, door-to-door and street collections, events, and from Europe.

To contact Andrew email andrewd@salviafundraising.co.uk or phone 01273 207626